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Ohio State quarterbacks coach and co-offensive coordinator Ryan Day is looking for big-armed quarterbacks for the future.

Ohio State recruiting mailbag: A change in QB recruiting; spring game commitments; Chris Holtmann’s hardwood efforts

Have Ohio State recruiting questions? We’ve got answers. Join us every Wednesday for the Land of 10 Ohio State recruiting mailbag. This week, we discuss Ohio State’s quarterback recruiting efforts and plans, how many commitments the spring game could yield and what to expect in basketball recruiting now that the season is over.

Good Wednesday afternoon, everyone.

Thanks for your questions this week. If you didn’t get to ask a question this week, make sure to send one to me on Twitter (@L10Ryan) or via email (DonnellyLandof10@gmail.com).

Let’s dive in.

You are definitely correct about Ohio State offering a multitude of quarterbacks. Ohio State has offered 11 QBs in the 2019 recruiting class, tied for the most offers at the position in any Urban Meyer recruiting class at Ohio State. The 2015 class also had 11 offers out to quarterbacks. Of course, that was the total at the end of the recruiting cycle for that class; the 2019 version still has nearly 11 months to go for more offers to pop up.

As to the second part of your question, I wouldn’t read too much into the labels. I don’t believe Ohio State’s on-field offense has reflected what they’re looking for in recruiting for the last two or three years. There are many reasons why that may be. I believe in the theory that J.T. Barrett was too strong as a runner and too middle-of-the-road and streaky as a passer to justify putting more of the game on his arm, but the point stands that Ohio State has been looking for stronger passing quarterbacks for some time.

Everything I’m hearing on the recruiting trail after visits from quarterbacks such as Grant Gunnell and Sam Howell is that Ohio State’s offense with either Dwayne Haskins or Joe Burrow at quarterback would have much less of the quarterback run as a staple and more passing duties for the quarterback. That’s how Kevin Wilson and Ryan Day generally have run their offenses at previous stops, and I think they’ll get back to it. Any quarterback Ohio State takes in this class will have to be able to win games with his arm, but the Buckeyes still want mobility.

In short, don’t worry about the labels, but expect a more advanced passing game from future Ohio State quarterbacks and offenses.

Last year, Ohio State landed two commitments — Oklahoma safety Josh Proctor and Tennessee tackle Max Wray — on the day of the spring game. Two other players who visited for the spring game — Florida cornerback Sevyn Banks and Georgia defensive back Brenton Cox — committed within a couple of weeks of the visit. Cox later de-committed and signed with Georgia.

I have a bit of difficulty seeing Ohio State pull quite that many commitments during the 2018 spring game, but it’s possible. A name that bears close watching is Georgia offensive lineman Harry Miller, who will make an official visit for the spring game. I have Ohio State as the favorite for Miller.

Another interesting spring game official visitor is Jalen Curry, who previously told me that Ohio State was a “dream offer” for him when he landed it. He’s a teammate of the Gunnell at Houston St. Pius X, and while I’m certainly not expecting a commitment, he seems like one of those kids who could commit out of nowhere.

However, until we have a more filled-out list of spring game visitors, it feels a little too early to throw darts at the wall and make predictions on this. I think it’s possible, but I’ll bet the under if the number we’re looking at is four commitments from the spring game. My answer could change as more visitors are lined up, however.

I admit that I’m simply not as well-versed in basketball recruiting as I am in football recruiting, but I do pick up tidbits of information here and there. I’ve heard that Ohio State is planning to pursue a graduate transfer point guard to add to the team for next season — a player who will be immediately eligible and will allow Buckeyes guard C.J. Jackson to move to more of an off-ball role.

Jackson averaged more than 12 points per game during this, his sophomore season but he’ll be a more effective contributor as a shooter and slasher than he will be a primary facilitator of Holtmann’s offense.

Here are a few prominent transfer options at point guard:

  • Fordham point guard Joseph Chartouny averaged 12.2 points per game, 5.6 rebounds, 4.6 assists and an astounding 3.3 steals while starting all but one of the Rams’ games this season. He’s a former Atlantic 10 rookie of the year. He will be immediately eligible with one remaining year to play. His transfer was first reported by ESPN’s Jeff Goodman. His teammate, Perris Hicks, also is an immediately eligible graduate transfer.
  • Maine point guard Aaron Calixte is being targeted by Oklahoma, per CBS Sports’ Jon Rothstein. Calixte averaged 16.9 points per game in 32 starts for a dismal Maine team, but his squad’s performance couldn’t be placed on his shoulders. He’s a graduate transfer to watch.
  • Two Pitt freshmen standouts — guards Marcus Carr and Parker Stewart — have asked for and been granted their release from the Panthers program, which fired coach Kevin Stallings and have yet to replace him. Sources close to the program indicated to me that both will await the hiring of Pitt’s new coach before deciding if they’ll leave or not, but they will be hotly pursued if they want to go elsewhere. Carr averaged 10 points and 4 assists per game while Stewart posted an average of 9.1 points and 3.3 rebounds. They’re part of a large Pitt contingent to have asked for and been granted their release, per ESPN’s Jeff Goodman. Despite being a freshman, Carr is expected to be immediately eligible. Stewart’s eligibility for next season has not been clarified.
  • Keep an eye on Vanderbilt grad transfer Larry Austin Jr., Northern Arizona product Torry Johnson and LSU’s Jalyn Patterson. All will be immediately eligible next season and are looking for a place to call home.